DANCING IN BLUE

By Katherine Schlosser There are other plants that produce a blue dye, especially Isatis tinctoria, woad, a primary competitor with...

400-Year Old Seeds, Nuts, and Other Artifacts—Archaeological Plant Finds From Jamestown, Virginia

By Leah Stricker Did you know that seeds, nuts, and even leaves can survive in the ground for many years,...

Uncovering Historical Past of Long Island with Denice Evans-Sheppard

Uncovering Historical Past of Long Island with Denice Evans-Sheppard

Denice Evans-Sheppard is the C.E.O and founder of Whispering Spirit Cultural Tours . These tours highlight the efforts of Indigenous...

The Feeling of Harvests to Come

by Beth Schreibman Gehring “After Lammas Day, corn ripens as much by night as by day.” – Author unknown There is...

Patchouli: What Was Once Old Becomes New Again…and Again

By Amy Forsberg You may have a strong reaction to just hearing the word “patchouli.” It seems to be one...

Basil – The King of Herbs

By Maryann Readal Although named by the Greeks, basil originated in India 5,000 years ago. In India today, the herb...

Calendula – Herb of the Month – An Herb of the Sun

By Maryann Readal The Romans are believed to have named the calendula after the Latin word calendae (a word referring...

African American Plant Medicines of the South Carolina Sea Islands

By Faith Mitchell, Ph.D. Editor’s Note: Dr. Mitchell’s original blog post was featured in April, 2020, in anticipation of The...

Tasty Tidbits: Celebrate with Tradition and Superstition

By Bonnie Porterfield The tradition of eating Hoppin’ John began on January 1, 1863, when the Emancipation Proclamation went into...

Ring Ye Solstice Bells: Reflections on the Longest Night of the Year

By Beth Schreibman-Gehring I always laugh and say when I am asked, that celebrating the Winter Solstice has always been...